Courses

 

Regents Earth Science            (a.k.a.  Physical Setting: Earth Science)        

The Earth Sciences explain how all other sciences apply to space, the weather, and the dynamic and dangerous planet we live on.  This is why some perceive Earth Science as 'hard'.  Earth Science demands critical thought, application of skills, and great depths of understanding - all evidence of higher levels of learning. 

The Earth Scientist must understand basic chemistry, basic physics, the basics of biology and the origins of life, Newtownian physics, thermodynamics, and be able to reason out how difficult to measure variables interact at great depths in our planet and change accordingly over deep time. 

The Earth Scientists is one who can critically reason and think in three-dimensions (spatial reasoning) while making connections amongst all the sciences and disciplines in order to apply our understanding toward human sustainability with the Earth on the surface.  Recently (geologically speaking), human sustainability has taking the forefront of interest.  This Stewardship Awareness also speaks to the  improved understanding of the planetary processes.

The Earth and Geosciences not only prepare students to prepare for life on this, a very dynamic planet, but to critically reason why natural processes happen as they do, and to live and act accordingly as one of many species dependent upon those processes.

Of course, all disciplines that humans study and find interest in return to (and stem from) how well we understand the processes of our planet.  Art, politics, history, music, politics, economics and human sustainability all interrelate to oceanography, climatology, meteorology, geology, and astronomy - the main components of The Earth Sciences. 


College Physical Geology     (dual-enrollment through the State University of New York: College at Oneonta, E.S.O.P.)

Dual Enrollment with State University of New York: College at Oneonta; E.S.O.P.
College credits are transferable to other colleges
$200  E.S.O.P. transcript processing fee to the College at Oneonta   
Prerequisite of Regents Earth Science

This full year laboratory college-level elective course for high school juniors and seniors begins where sections of the curriculum outlined by the New York State syllabus in Physical Setting Earth Science (geology) left off, but delves more deeply.   This full year laboratory course will take place with double periods of instruction every other day, and single periods of instruction on the days between.   Topics include but are not limited to past and present resources and their extraction processes, volcanology, mineralogy, seismology, petrology, natural hazard mitigation, discussion and debates centered around some of today’s most prevalent geo-environmental/geo-political/geo-economic issues, the solutions can be applied, quantitative and qualitative analysis of materials data, and Plate Tectonics.   There are multiple excursions, and one required field trip.


College Physical Geology is a dual-enrollment course.  Students who successfully complete all coursework and requirements of the 

The New York State College at Oneonta Earth Science Outreach Program through the College at Oneonta earn four undergraduate science credits (transferable) through the State University of New York.  E.S.O.P. requires a $200 processing and fee (students are not charged for the college credits).  Students who do not enroll to earn college credit will complete the same college-level coursework as those who have enrolled for college credits.

College Physical  Geology is designed to challenge high school juniors and seniors through their development of science literacy, spatial reasoning, critical thinking skills, effective communication, organization and college-level study skills.  The scientifically-literate citizen; the critical thinker; the real-life problem-solver – the person whose communication and social skills set them apart from all others as a positive asset to the field, these skills dictate that they should be hired – and these are the skills that are sought by employers.

Earth's Fury

Earth's Fury is a non-laboratory, non-Regents, one-credit science elective for Mahopac high school juniors and seniors. Meeting one period per day, students will engage in learning about natural hazards, evaluate current hazard mitigation techniques and utilize scientifically-oriented articles that address scales such as temporal, scope, magnitude, cost, energy, human interference potential, and rates. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate their own and others’ work, present their knowledge and expertise in topics by putting into practice the necessary ‘interviewing’ skills for success in college and the workplace.

This course examines natural systems on Earth, in Earth’ atmosphere, in outer space and the impacts these systems have on the human species. Students will be able to identify and analyze natural hazards and disasters - both natural and human influenced, to evaluate the relative risks associated with them, and to examine alternative solutions to mitigate their influence on our species.

Topics for study, application and discussion include hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, drought, floods, landslides, climate change, volcanic eruptions (at various scales), rising sea levels, loss of topsoil, solar storms, supernovae, overpopulation, air quality index, among others. Students will successfully apply 'interviewing skills' (social skills, presentation skills, writing skills, effective communication skills, critical thinking skills, etc.).


Astronomy 

An extension of the earth sciences, Astronomy is a non-laboratory, non-Regents half-credit science elective for high school juniors and seniors.  Meeting one period every other day, students will engage in home research and study, classroom discussions, and hands-on activities on current and historical astronomical topics, evaluate current articles on astronomical topics, evaluate their own and others’ work, present their knowledge and expertise in topics by putting into practice the necessary ‘interviewing’ skills for success in college and the workplace. 

Topics for study, application and discussion include: the contents of our solar system, the earth-moon system, evolution of stars and galaxies, celestial mechanics (motion and position of celestial bodies), astronomical instruments, observations and measurements, and cosmology.  Students will develop skills in naked eye observations of celestial objects.

Global Environmental Issues

Global Environmental Issues is a non-laboratory, non-Regents science, one-credit elective for high school juniors and seniors.  Meeting one period every other day, students will engage in discussions on current controversial environmental topics, evaluate current environmental and scientifically-oriented articles, evaluate their own and others’ work, present their knowledge and expertise in topics by putting into practice the necessary ‘interviewing’ skills for success in college and the workplace. 

This course examines natural systems and the adverse impacts that human activities have upon these systems.  Students will be able to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and /or preventing them.  

Topics for study, application and discussion include Human Sustainability, Climate Changes, human population growth, the Impact Natural Hazards and a Dynamic Planet has on Humans, biodiversity, forests and deforestation, world hunger, energy resources; water and air pollution; and the positive role that Humans can play to mitigate these hazards through Stewardship Awareness.  Students will successfully apply 'interviewing skills' (social skills, presentation skills, writing skills, effective communication skills, critical thinking skills, etc.).